Quotation Explorer - 'Jane Austen'

To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment. - Jane Austen
but for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short. - Jane Austen
Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch. - Jane Austen
I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman's feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of. - Jane Austen
The only time I ever really suffered in body or mind, the only time that I ever fancied myself unwell, or had any ideas of danger, was the winter that I passed by myself. As long as we could be together, nothing ever ailed me, and I never met with the smallest inconvenience. - Jane Austen
I have changed my mind, and changed the trimmings of my cap this morning; they are now such as you suggested. - Jane Austen
With a book he was regardless of time. - Jane Austen
We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be. - Jane Austen
I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man. - Jane Austen
De las Gray, que más de una flor nace y florece sin ser vista, perfumando pródigamente el aire del desierto. - Jane Austen
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in reading a good novel, must be incredibly stupid - Jane Austen
In all the important preparations of the mind she was complete: being prepared for matrimony by an hatred of home, restraint, and tranquillity; by the misery of disappointed affection, and contempt of the man she was to marry. - Jane Austen
Loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex. - Jane Austen
Completely and perfectly and incandescently happy... - Jane Austen
I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house tonight or never. - Jane Austen
Wisdom is better than wit, and in the long run will certainly have the laugh on her side. - Jane Austen
Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. - Jane Austen
A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment. - Jane Austen
Mr. Collins was to attend them, at the request of Mr. Bennet, who was most anxious to get rid of him, and have his library to himself - Jane Austen
Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. - Mr Bennet - Jane Austen
Every man is surrounded by a neighborhood of voluntary spies. - Jane Austen
You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve. - Jane Austen
But I will not repine. It cannot last long. He will be forgot, and we shall all be as we were before. - Jane Austen
One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty. - Jane Austen
What dreadful weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance. - Jane Austen
I will only add, God bless you. - Jane Austen
Why not seize the pleasure at once, how often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparations. - Jane Austen
Nothing amuses me more than the easy manner with which everybody settles the abundance of those who have a great deal less than themselves. - Jane Austen
One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other. - Jane Austen
Tempo ou oportunidade não determinam a intimidade, apenas a disposição. - Jane Austen
It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation. - Jane Austen
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn? - Jane Austen
Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like. - Jane Austen
An artist cannot do anything slovenly. - Jane Austen
There is no other enjoyment like reading - Jane Austen
Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all. - Jane Austen
Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?"- Elizabeth Bennet - Jane Austen
A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of. - Jane Austen
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife. - Jane Austen
Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously.... Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. - Jane Austen
It was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly. - Jane Austen
A persuadable temper might sometimes be as much in favour of happiness as a very resolute character. - Jane Austen
At my time of life opinions are tolerably fixed. It is not likely that I should now see or hear anything to change them. - Jane Austen
Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way. - Jane Austen
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love. - Jane Austen
One half of the world can not understand the pleasures of the other. - Jane Austen
Life is just a quick succession of busy nothings. - Jane Austen
A woman should never be trusted with money. - Jane Austen
The more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much! - Jane Austen
There is hardly any personal defect which an agreeable manner might not gradually reconcile one to. - Jane Austen
I do not want people to be agreeable, as it saves me that trouble of liking them. - Jane Austen
But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her. Something must and will happen to throw a hero in her way. - Jane Austen
To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment. - Jane Austen
Mr. ***** is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends -- whether he may be equally capable of retaining them, is less certain. - Jane Austen
There are people who, the more you do for them, the less they will do for themseselves. - Jane Austen
But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by every body at times, whatever be their education or state. - Jane Austen
the rent here may be low but i believe we have it on very hard terms --sense & sensibility - Jane Austen
You have delighted us long enough. - Jane Austen
I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. - Jane Austen
When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort. - Jane Austen
I do not pretend to say that I was not very much pleased with him; but while I have Udolpho to read, I feel as if nobody could make me miserable. - Jane Austen
You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. - Jane Austen
Oh! dear; I was so miserable! I am sure I must have been as white as my gown. - Jane Austen
Everybody likes to go their own way--to choose their own time and manner of devotion. - Jane Austen
One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy. - Jane Austen
An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones. - Jane Austen
And pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked. - Jane Austen
We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of a man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him. - Jane Austen
How much I love every thing that is decided and open! - Jane Austen
Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of. - Jane Austen
No one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with. - Jane Austen
Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody. - Jane Austen
When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene. - Jane Austen
Which of all my important nothings shall I tell you first? - Jane Austen
It's a truth universally acknowledged... - Jane Austen
Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong? - Jane Austen
Anne did think on the question with perfect decision, and said as much in replay as her own feelings could accomplish, or as his seemed able to bear, for he was too much affected to renew the subject - and when he spoke again, it was something totally different. - Jane Austen
We met Dr. Hall in such deep mourning that either his mother, his wife, or himself must be dead. - Jane Austen
My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company. - Jane Austen
She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped. - Jane Austen
I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures. - Jane Austen
One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best. - Jane Austen
"Only a novel"... in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language. - Jane Austen
It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. - Jane Austen
One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering. - Jane Austen
In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes. - Jane Austen
I pay very little regard...to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person. - Jane Austen
I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship. - Jane Austen
Family connexions were always worth preserving, good company always worth seeking. - Jane Austen
Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well. - Jane Austen
Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left. - Jane Austen
Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. - Jane Austen
...And talking of the dear family party which would then be restored, of their mutual pursuits and cheerful society, as the only happiness worth a wish. - Jane Austen
What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance. - Jane Austen
I am excessively fond of music, but without the smallest skill or right of judging of anybody's performance. - Jane Austen
We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days. - Jane Austen
Those who do not complain are never pitied. - Jane Austen
There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere. - Jane Austen
Nothing was so likely to do her good as a little quiet cheerfulness at home. - Jane Austen
A woman, especially if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can. - Jane Austen
The evils arising from the loss of her uncle were neither trifling nor likely to lessen; and when thought had been freely indulged, in contrasting the past and the present, the employment of mind and dissipation of unpleasant ideas which only reading could produce made her thankfully turn to a book. - Jane Austen
Usted es demasiado generosa para jugar con mis sentimientos. Si los suyos siguen siendo los mismos del pasado abril, dígamelo en seguida. Mi afecto y mis deseos no han cambiado, pero una palabra suya me silenciará para siempre - Jane Austen
I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other. - Jane Austen
It is singularity which often makes the worst part of our suffering, as it always does of our conduct. - Jane Austen
The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away. - Jane Austen
Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see fault in any body. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in my life.""I would wish not to be hasty in censuring any one; but I always speak what I think. - Jane Austen
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. - Jane Austen
Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity. - Jane Austen
Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken. - Jane Austen
To be claimed as a good, though in an improper style, is at least better than being rejected as no good at all. - Jane Austen
I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement. - Jane Austen
I do not want people to be agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them. - Jane Austen
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. - Jane Austen
It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. - Jane Austen
The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's. - Jane Austen
How little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue. - Jane Austen
Estaré encantado en hacer que se acostumbre a mi manera de ser. - Jane Austen
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn? - Jane Austen
Where any one body of educated men, of whatever denomination, are condemned indiscriminately, there must be a deficiency of information, or...of something else. - Jane Austen
There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart. - Jane Austen
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